#3 Facts

Hi!! Today I’m going to tell the fact how to survive when a plane wanna crash ( ̄▽ ̄)ノ


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More than 95 percent of the airplane passengers involved in a crash survive, according to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB).

Despite this reassuring statistic, many people adopt a fatalistic attitude toward plane crashes — which can result in a dangerous level of apathy, especially regarding preflight safety briefings.

“One reason passengers do not pay attention to the briefing may be their belief that accidents are not survivable,” according to a 2001 NTSB report.

But not only are plane crashes survivable, there are things you can do to ensure your safety, experts say.

Dress for survival

Before you leave for the airport, dress appropriately. In the event of an emergency, you’ll want to be wearing practical shoes and clothing.

It’s also smart to wear long pants and long-sleeved shirts to protect your skin from flames and sharp objects. According to the NTSB report, 68 percent of passengers killed in plane accidents died as a result of injuries sustained during post-crash fire.

Choose your seat wisely

An oft-cited analysis performed by Popular Mechanics in 2007 found that passengers in the rear of an aircraft were significantly more likely to survive than passengers near the front.

In looking at fatal airplane crashes since 1971 where seating charts were available, the analysis revealed that people sitting behind the wing had a 40 percent greater chance of surviving than passengers in the front of the plane (where first-class seats are generally located).

Of course, all airplane crashes are different, and in a few crashes, passengers in the front of the plane fared better.

Regardless of which section of the plane you’re sitting in, try to sit in or near an exit row. Professor Ed Galea, a fire safety engineer at the University of Greenwich in England, found that most crash survivors moved five rows or fewer before exiting a burning plane.

Galea also determined that aisle seats were somewhat safer than window or center seats, according to ABC News.

Takeoff and landing

Safety experts have found that the most accident-prone times of an airplane flight are the three minutes after takeoff and the eight minutes before landing, ABC News reports.

During these times, it makes sense to keep your shoes on, keep your tray table up and make note of the two nearest exits (both in front of and behind you).

Experts also recommend placing a carry-on item under the seat in front of you. “That gives a block there, so the feet and legs can’t go up under the seat in front,” Corbett said, nothing that broken bones in feet and legs are common in crashes.”

If an impact is imminent, it’s important to remain calm and assume a survival position: If you have a seat in front of you, cross your hands on the seat back and place your forehead on top of your hands.

If you don’t have a seat back facing you, bend forward and hug your knees with your head down. Passengers should also take sharp objects, like pens and keys, out of their pockets — these can stab through skin in an impact.

The 90-second rule

The first 90 seconds after a crash are the most important — if you can stay calm and move out of the plane quickly, your odds of survival are much greater.

Some passengers are in such a state of panic that they can’t unbuckle their seat belts: NTSB reports have found that many crash victims are found in their seats with their seat belts still buckled.

“That’s why it is important to know what to do, even without the orders,” Corbett told WebMD. “Some people sit and wait for orders, and if they don’t hear any, then they sit right through the disaster.”

One reason so many passengers survived the Asiana crash was their ability to exit the airplane quickly.

Gathering luggage and other personal belongings can be a fatal mistake. “You might get stuck on that plane with your luggage,” Corbett told WebMD.

As safe as an escalator

One thing safety experts are quick to emphasize is the remarkable safety record of commercial airlines.

Only one in 1.2 million flights ends up in an accident, according to NTSB statistics. Vast improvements in safety training, in nonflammable aircraft materials and in firefighting equipment have made flying much safer than driving.

The odds of dying in a plane crash are about one in 11 million, according to Discovery, while the odds of dying in an auto accident are about one in 5,000.

“Flying the friendly skies is, I believe, the safest mode of travel,” Corbett told WebMD. “That doesn’t mean we should take it lightly and that we shouldn’t be prepared. Don’t let it scare you. Just have a plan.” -(www.livescience.com)


Just read this and you’ll be safe if you ride a plane and wanted to crash ∩(︶▽︶)∩ But you should do to give you a better shot at making it out alive. Following are five tips that everyone should know before they get on their next flight:

  • After you board, find the two closest exits and count the rows between them and your seat. In the event of darkness or smoke, feel the seats and count until you reach the exit row.
  • Ready for the impact. The official FAA crash position is to extend your arms, cross your hands and place them on the seat in front of you, and then place your head against the back of your hands. Tuck your feet under your seat as far as you can. If you have no seat in front of you, bend your upper body over with your head down and wrap your arms behind your knees. Always stow your carry-on bag under the seat in front of you to block the area.
  • Wear long pants, sleeves and closed-toed shoes. This will help protect you from glass, metal and the elements.
  • If you’re with your family, talk to your children/parents about what to do in the event of an emergency. It’s easier for one parent to help a single child than for both to try to keep everyone together.
  • Pay atte­ntion to the preflight instructions, as all planes are different. When the oxygen mask drops, put it on yourself first before attempting to help someone else. If you fall unconscious, you have no chance of helping your travel mate.­­­

Remember this all so you’ll be safe if you ride a plane!! Well, thank you for reading ^^

 

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